information

Introduction to Regenerative processes

Mr Datta was at the forefront of the ABISCUS trial which investigated Autologous Bone Marrow Implantation of Cells which involves coating damaged cartilage with stem cells, taken from a patient’s own hip. He now offers this treatment privately depending on suitability. If you are unsuitable, you may still be able to have PRP injections which Mr Datta also offers privately. PRP injections which accelerate healing of tendon injuries and osteoarthritis naturally without subjecting the patient to significant risk. If you would like to read more on the procedures please see below.

Book A Consultation

If you would like to book a consultation with Gorav Datta to discuss regenerative procedures please contact us on 0800 433 4929 

prp injections

platelet rich plasma injections

Mr Datta carries out PRP injections for hip and knee for insured and self-funding patients of which the guide price is £1,800 for a unilateral injection and £2,200 for bilateral injections.

The cost of a self-funding initial consultation with Mr Datta is £250. Although Mr Datta sees patients for consultations in Hampshire at Nuffield Health Wessex Hospital and Spire Southampton Hospital, and in London at 25 Harley Street and Princess Grace Hospital, the injections are carried out at Spire Southampton and Highgate Hospital only.

PRP therapy offers a promising solution to accelerate healing of tendon injuries and osteoarthritis naturally without subjecting the patient to significant risk. PRP is an emerging treatment in a new health sector known as “Orthobiologics”. The philosophy is to merge cutting edge technology with the body’s natural ability to heal itself. Blood is made of RBC (Red Blood Cells), WBC (White Blood Cells), Plasma, and Platelets. The process is entirely safe and only uses products derived from the patient’s own blood.

PRP is virtually a cocktail of many proteins that collectively stimulate repair and regeneration. However there are some proteins included in PRP that we can now selectively isolate to promote anti-inflammatory effects and pain reduction. Scientists have now developed natural/homeopathic based tools to selectively isolate the cells/growth factors within PRP that meet our needs of customizing the treatment by reducing inflammation and simultaneously stimulating repair.

During the past several years, much has been written about a preparation called platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and its potential effectiveness in the treatment of injuries.

Many famous athletes — Tiger Woods, tennis star Rafael Nadal, and several others — have received PRP for various problems, such as sprained knees and chronic tendon injuries. These types of conditions have typically been treated with medications, physical therapy, or even surgery. Some athletes have credited PRP with their being able to return more quickly to competition.

platelet rich plasma FAQ's

What is prp?

Although blood is mainly a liquid (called plasma), it also contains small solid components (red cells, white cells, and platelets.) The platelets are best known for their importance in clotting blood. However, platelets also contain hundreds of proteins called growth factors which are very important in the healing of injuries.

PRP is plasma with many more platelets than what is typically found in blood. The concentration of platelets — and, thereby, the concentration of growth factors — can be 5 to 10 times greater (or richer) than usual.

To develop a PRP preparation, blood must first be drawn from a patient. The platelets are separated from other blood cells and their concentration is increased during a process called centrifugation. Then the increased concentration of platelets is combined with the remaining blood..

How does prp work?
Although it is not exactly clear how PRP works, laboratory studies have shown that the increased concentration of growth factors in PRP can potentially speed up the healing process.

To speed healing, the injury site is treated with the PRP preparation. This can be done in one of two ways:

– PRP can be carefully injected into the injured area. For example, in Achilles tendonitis, a condition commonly seen in runners and tennis players, the heel cord can become swollen, inflamed, and painful. A mixture of PRP and local anesthetic can be injected directly into this inflamed tissue. Afterwards, the pain at the area of injection may actually increase for the first week or two, and it may be several weeks before the patient feels a beneficial effect.

– PRP may also be used to improve healing after surgery for some injuries. For example, an athlete with a completely torn heel cord may require surgery to repair the tendon. Healing of the torn tendon can possibly be improved by treating the injured area with PRP during surgery. This is done by preparing the PRP in a special way that allows it to actually be stitched into torn tissues.

How effective is PRP?
Research studies are currently being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP treatment. At this time, the results of these studies are inconclusive because the effectiveness of PRP therapy can vary. Factors that can influence the effectiveness of PRP treatment include:

 The area of the body being treated

 The overall health of the patient

 Whether the injury is acute (such as from a fall) or chronic (an injury developing over time)

Chronic Tendon Injuries
According to the research studies currently reported, PRP is most effective in the treatment of chronic tendon injuries, especially tennis elbow, a very common injury of the tendons on the outside of the elbow.

The use of PRP for other chronic tendon injuries — such as chronic Achilles tendonitis or inflammation of the patellar tendon at the knee (jumper’s knee) is promising. However, it is difficult to say at this time that PRP therapy is any more effective than traditional treatment of these problems.

Acute ligament & muscle injuries
Much of the publicity PRP therapy has received has been about the treatment of acute sports injuries, such as ligament and muscle injuries. PRP has been used to treat professional athletes with common sports injuries like pulled hamstring muscles in the thigh and knee sprains. There is no

definitive scientific evidence, however, that PRP therapy actually improves the healing process in these types of injuries.

Surgery
More recently, PRP has been used during certain types of surgery to help tissues heal. It was first thought to be beneficial in shoulder surgery to repair torn rotator cuff tendons. However, the results so far show little or no benefit when PRP is used in these types of surgical procedures.

Surgery to repair torn knee ligaments, especially the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is another area where PRP has been applied. At this time, there appears to be little or no benefit from using PRP in this instance.

Knee Arthritis
Some initial research is being done to evaluate the effectiveness of PRP in the treatment of the arthritic knee. It is still too soon to determine if this form of treatment will be any more effective than current treatment methods.
Fractures
PRP has been used in a very limited way to speed the healing of broken bones. So far, it has shown no significant benefit.

Book A Consultation

If you would like to book a consultation with Gorav Datta to discuss plasma injections please contact us on 0800 433 4929 

regenerative procedure

about regenerative procedure

Mr Datta carries out stem cell therapy to treat isolated, full thickness articular cartilage defects and is not necessarily suitable for wide spread established arthritis or as a joint replacement alternative. This is currently not available on NHS, and the ABICUS trial has now ended, therefore this is currently available for insured and self-funding patients of which the guide price is £10,000 per joint (we will provide patients with a bespoke quote following consultation).

The cost of a self-funding initial consultation with Mr Datta is £250. Although Mr Datta sees patients for consultations in Hampshire at Nuffield Health Wessex Hospital and Spire Southampton Hospital, and in London at 25 Harley Street and Princess Grace Hospital, the stem cell therapy procedure is carried out at Spire Southampton and Highgate Hospital only.

Cartilage is a tough, flexible tissue that covers the surface of joints and enables bones to slide over one another while reducing friction and acting as a shock absorber. Damage to this tissue in the knee or hips is common and occurs mainly following sudden twists or direct blows, such as falls or heavy tackles playing sports such as football and rugby, but can also develop over time through gradual wear and tear. Damage to the articular cartilage (chondral defects) does not heal when injured, leading to exposure of the bone itself, this may increase in size over time leading to increased pain and disability. Untreated, chondral defects may eventually lead to osteoarthritis and patients may ultimately require joint replacements to relieve symptoms.

Patients will need to have had an up to date MRI scan so that the cartilage cover can be assessed. It would help if they have already had an MRI prior to initial consultation, alternatively they can see Mr Datta first and he can then arrange this for them. Suitability for stem cell therapy will be dependent on the extent of damage to the cartilage in the joint.

The procedure itself is performed arthroscopically (key hole surgery). Patients often ask whether stem cell therapy involves surgery on two separate occasions which it does not, a single operation is normally required. The procedure is carried out under general anaesthesia, and as a day case for knee patients and often an overnight stay is required for hip patients. An aspirate of the patients blood and/or bone marrow is taken from your pelvic area with a special needle, this is then processed whilst you are in theatre to harvest their stem cells. Whilst this is being done, Mr Datta will perform the arthroscopy to deal with any other issues affecting the joint and to prepare it for the stem cells. Once ready, the stem cells, alongside a suitable scaffold, are then injected through the same keyholes used for the arthroscopy to the area of defect.

Following the procedure, the first 6-12 weeks are very important and patients will require crutches. Knee patients will be required to wear a knee brace for the first 6 weeks with gradual increase of range of motion, and follow a strict toe-touch weight bearing only during this time. Hip patients must be partial weight bearing too with the use of crutches. Patients will also be given exercises to do during the 6-12 weeks.

Regenerative Procedure FAQ's

What are stem cells?
Stem cells are perhaps Nature’s best-kept secret. These cells, which are found in multicellular organisms, such as humans, not only have the ability to divide (mitosis) but also to form various structures such as cartilage, bone and many more. The process is called ‘differentiation’ and is important in Stem Cell Surgery.
What types of stem cell are there?
There are two basic forms of stem cell – the embryonic stem cell and adult stem cell. Adult stem cells, which are also known as mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs are of great interest to researchers, scientists and surgeons alike. MSCs are free of the controversy that surrounds the embryonic stem cells and yet have the potential to form new tissues. At the Hip & Knee Clinic we use the MSCs. This gives us the ability to repair and regenerate tissues such as cartilage and bone more effectively.

MSCs can be found at various locations in the body, including bone marrow, adipose tissue (fat) and peripheral blood. We favour the use of marrow-based or peripheral blood stem cells.

Where do the cells come from
There are two basic forms of stem cell – the embryonic stem cell and adult stem cell. Adult stem cells, which are also known as mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs are of great interest to researchers, scientists and surgeons alike. MSCs are free of the controversy that surrounds the embryonic stem cells and yet have the potential to form new tissues. At the Hip & Knee Clinic we use the MSCs. This gives us the ability to repair and regenerate tissues such as cartilage and bone more effectively.

MSCs can be found at various locations in the body, including bone marrow, adipose tissue (fat) and peripheral blood. We favour the use of marrow-based or peripheral blood stem cells.

Where can stem cells be used?
By their very nature, stem cells can be used in a variety of different situations to help in the repair and regeneration of damaged tissues and structures. In joint preservation, one role of stem cells is in the possible treatment of arthritis of the hip and knee joints. This can potentially be accomplished by regeneration of cartilage (gristle). In simple terms, the gristle on the joint surface is the barrier to arthritis. Once this layer is damaged, the joint is likely to progress to frank arthritis, which presents as pain, stiffness and loss of function. Stem cell therapy may be used in an attempt to encourage regeneration of this gristle layer. The procedure is designed to help preserve the natural hip and knee joints and perhaps to delay or prevent the need for more major operations such as replacement of the hip or knee joint.

Another area of particular interest for stem cell therapy in the hip and knee is to help with the regeneration of dead bone. In a condition called avascular necrosis, or AVN, there is death of a segment of the bone near the joint. This can sometimes progress onwards to become severe arthritis. Early reports of the use of stem cells to regenerate bone in AVN are encouraging.

There are many other reasons why stem cells might be used. These techniques may be relevant to different patients and are employed as required.

What does the procedure involve?
The procedure is in the form of arthroscopy (keyhole surgery) of the hip or knee. Patients often ask whether stem cell therapy involves surgery on two separate occasions. For the techniques that we use, only a single operation is normally required. This is normally carried out as day-case procedure for knee arthroscopy, most hip arthroscopy patients will have one night’s stay in hospital. Once the patient is under general anaesthesia, an aspirate of their blood and/or marrow is taken with a special needle. The aspirate is then processed in the operating theatre, and while the patient is still asleep, in order to harvest the stem cells. At the same time the keyhole operation (arthroscopy) is commenced to access the hip or knee joint. The surgeon uses specialist arthroscopy techniques to prepare the tissue bed so that it is ready to receive the stem cells. The harvested stem cells,

alongside a suitable scaffold, are then injected through the same keyholes that are routinely used for the arthroscopy.

What are the side effects?
Any surgical intervention carries a degree of risk and those are explained elsewhere on this website. However, the surgical procedures used for stem cell therapy are the same as those for routine hip or knee arthroscopy operations (complications of hip & knee arthroscopy). There is a theoretical risk of infection, but this is low and surgery is in any event covered by antibiotic treatment. As for the stem cells, these are derived from the patient’s own blood or marrow, so there is no risk of rejection or disease transmission.
What is the evidence for stem cell therapy?
Stem cell therapy is a relatively new procedure. However, it has created so much interest worldwide that extensive research has been taking place in this field. Animal and human studies have been published that have suggested a safe and favourable response to stem cell therapy in hips, knees as well as ankles. The Hip & Knee clinic pioneered the ABICUS procedure and is conducting a registered clinical trial (www.abicus-trial.com) and almost all patients who undergo surgical treatment under our care are specifically followed up as part of the assessment of treatment. This is an invaluable source of information that helps us to inform our patients, publish in the literature, and to train others who are interested in the techniques we undertake.

Book A Consultation

If you would like to book a consultation with Gorav Datta to discuss regenerative procedures please contact us on 0800 433 4929 

I want to thank Mr. Datta for taking such good care of me during both hip replacement procedures. It was my first major surgery and he helped calm my nerves. Both surgeries were successful and the after care was excellent. I am now completely pain free and able to do things I was not able to do for a number of years.

S Kirby

I must say my overall experience at Spire under Mr Datta was first class and I am very grateful to all involved

Peter L

My care and treatment has been excellent. From my first consultation through to my surgery, I have been kept well informed and have had all the information I’ve needed to ensure the surgery went well and that I make a speedy recovery. I would highly recommend Mr Datta.

Mr King

I had a total knee replacement done and had the best care. Yes did experience a long wait to go to surgery but that's expected in most hospitals. Was in for 3 days and couldn't fault the care, nurses and cleanliness of the hospital. Lovely food. One nurse in particular always managed to make me smile

P Elliott

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contact

T: 0800 433 4929

F: 0330 323 0254

E: info@goravdatta.com

address

Wessex Nuffield Hospital

Winchester Road

Eastleigh, Hampshire

SO53 2DW

PRP

PRP FAQ's

Regenerative

Regenerative faq's